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PE Curriculum

 

 

National Curriculum Progression in Physical Education

Physical Education—Intent  

At St John with St Augustine Primary School, our Intent is to provide high quality Physical Education which builds progressively on prior skills, knowledge and understanding.

 

EYFS—The Intent in the Foundation Stage is to focus on developing fine and gross motor skills. We focus on 5 Fundamental Movement Skills (FMS), providing the children with a range of opportunities to do this with different activities.

Key Stage One—The Intent in Year One is to carry out a BASELINE assessment of the 10 Fundamental Movement Skills. From this assessment, the teacher can specifically tailor their PE Curriculum to suit the children’s needs, making learning more affective and meaningful. Instant intervention can be given to those who are less proficient to ensure that meet end of year expectations.

As children continue through Key Stage One, teachers focus on developing the areas of weakness within the 10 FMS and also teach the children how to apply these skills in a contextual way. They should develop their knowledge in using simple tactics in game type activities and creating sequences of movement through dance and gymnastic type activities.

By the end of Key Stage One, are tested on the 10 FMS again. This will show the impact on their performance including which skills they have mastered. This information is then passed on to the Year Three teacher who can build on these skills.

Lower Key Stage Two—The Intent at Years Three and Four in Games is to develop children’s attacking skills through a range of different activities and sports. This is done through small modified games and tasks, where the sides are intentionally uneven e.g. 3 vs 1, 4 vs 2. They will also develop their knowledge of attacking tactics which they will demonstrate across a range of games.

Lower Key Stage Two—The Intent at Years Five and Six is to continue so develop children’s attacking skills when working in small teams and develop their understanding of defending strategies. These will be delivered through modified, small games again, where sides are uneven e.g. 5 vs 3, 5 vs 4, 4 vs 4 and finally equal side (5 vs 5).

 

 

 

Implementation

National Curriculum Progression of Learning in Physical Education

EYFS—Early Learning Goals

Expected

Children show good control and coordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment effectively. Children know the importance for good health of physical exercise and a healthy diet, and talk about ways to keep healthy and safe. Children play cooperatively, taking turns with others. They take account of one another’s ideas about how to organise their activity.

Exceeding

Children can hop confidently and skip in time to music Children know about and can make healthy choices in relation to healthy eating and exercise. Children play group games with rules.

 

Key Stage One

Pupils should continue to develop fundamental movement skills, become increasingly competent and confident and access a broad range of opportunities to extend their agility, balance and co-ordination, individually and with others. They should be able to engage in competitive (both against self and against others) and co-operative physical activities, in a range of increasingly challenging situations.

 

Key Stage Two

Pupils should continue to apply and develop a broader range of skills, learning how to use them in different ways and to link them to make actions and sequences of movement. They should enjoy communicating, collaborating and competing with each other. They should develop an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports and learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success.

End of Key Stage One and Two Expectations in Physical Education

HEAD (thinking) - HANDS (doing) - HEART (behavioural change) Physical Education is the perfect vehicle through which to develop the crucial skills and attributes required for the modern world.

Effective delivery of the National Curriculum Expectations will ensure that children develop into thinking physical beings and doing physical beings which impact on the behavioural change to equip them for lifelong participation.

Using the concept of Head (thinking) Hands (doing) and Heart (behavioural change) this poster is designed to support primary teachers to assess their children at the end of Key Stages One and Two. Most should be well established within the end of Key Stage Attainment Target, a few will still be emerging and a few will be exceeding it.

 

THE THINKING PHYSCIAL CHANGES

PHYSICAL BEING: • Decision maker

• Analytical-deep understanding

• Confident

• Creative

 

THE BEHAVIOURAL CHANGE PHYSICAL BEING:

• Involved and engaged

  • Grows socially and emotionally

• Builds character and values

• Leads a healthy active lifestyle

 

THE DOING PHYSICAL BEING:

• Physically competent

• Grows and develops

• Physically active

 • Competitive

 

 

End of Key Stage One Expectations

THE THINKING PHYSICAL BEING:

• Able to make simple decisions and be aware of what they need to do to improve

• Be creative when using and developing skills and tactics in simple sequences and activities

THE BEHAVIOURAL CHANGE PHYSICAL BEING:

 • Able to engage in competitive (against self & others) & cooperative physical activities in a range of increasingly challenging situations

• Keen to participate in activities and clubs both in school and in the wider community

THE DOING PHYSICAL BEING:

• Develop fundamental movement skills

• Become increasingly competent & confident & access a broad range of opportunities

• Extend agility, balance & coordination, individually & with others

• Engage in competitive (against self & others) and cooperative physical activities in a range of increasingly challenging situations

 

 

 

End of Key Stage Two Expectations

THE THINKING PHYSICAL BEING:

• Learn how to use a broad range of skills in different ways and to link them to make actions and sequences of movement

• Should develop an understanding of how to improve in different physical activities and sports

• Learn how to evaluate and recognise their own success

 

THE BEHAVIOURAL CHANGE PHYSICAL BEING:

 • Should enjoy communicating, collaborating and competing with each other

• Keen to continue participating in activities and clubs both in school and in the wider community

 

THE DOING PHYSICAL BEING:

• Should continue to apply and develop a broader range of skills

• Develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance

 

 

End of EYFS Expectations

 

Expected

Children show good control and coordination in large and small movements. They move confidently in a range of ways, safely negotiating space. They handle equipment effectively. Children know the importance for good health of physical exercise and a healthy diet, and talk about ways to keep healthy and safe. Children play cooperatively, taking turns with others. They take account of one another’s ideas about how to organise their activity.

Exceeding

Children can hop confidently and skip in time to music Children know about and can make healthy choices in relation to healthy eating and exercise. Children play group games with rules.

 

What is PE?

A high-quality physical education curriculum inspires all pupils to succeed and excel in physical activity. It should provide children with opportunities to become physically confident in a way which supports their health and fitness.
Opportunities to compete in sport and other activities build character to help embed values such as fairness and respect.

 

Why is it an important part of my child's learning?

PE is important because it allows every child to:
  • develop and excel in a broad range of physical activities
  • be physically active for sustained period of time
  • engage in competitive sport and activities
  • lead healthy and active lifestyles

Why is physical education so important to our young people?

A look at the importance of physical education to young people in schools through physical activity and development, social skills and enjoyment levels.

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